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Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
presidential debate. this is what they call the spin room. i know my first thought, i thought it was a pbs pledge-a-thons because it looks like that. i don't know if they are giving away tote bags, but they are all reporters. there are hundreds of them. there's the spin aloe, just to the right, and so what's going to happen after the debate is that all the romney and obama forces come out in droves to tell you how brilliantly each side did while before the debate, up until now, they say each side is essentially an idiot. they can't debate, barely walk, talk, and chew gum at the same time. that's called lowering expectations. who can blame them? i built a career on it. this guy didn't have to do that. one of the most widely respected figures in washington. he is many say of national to denver himself. he could be in the presidential circle, senator john thune. good to see you, senator. >> good to see you and be with you as always. neil: i covered a few debates. we're going into them, each guy sells their guy to the closest thing as an idiot, and no matter how poorly he did, he's a genius. >
to your head. >> joining us this morning, authors of the book. the documentary airs tonight on pbs and tomorrow night as well. the book is amazing. i know richard had a chance to see the documentary. he's been raving about it for the last several days. >> so exciting to see this finally come to pass after all these years. >> when you're writing the book you talked about individual women's stories. sort of the horrors that they had to overcome. and sort of what input really helped them. "half the sky" we should mention comes from women holding up half the sky. >> a chinese saying. >> exactly. tell me little bit about what you loved about your research in the book that made you think this needs to be a documentary. >> it really started many, many years ago when we were in china. and we had found out that there were some problems in the countryside with women. we had covered tian men square. we started discovering there were 30 million missing female girls, female babies, from the chinese population. which was a stunning number. >> 30 million. >> 30 million. partly through infanticid
minutes and then there is a rebuttal. megyn: jim lehrer of pbs will be moderating. they devote the rest of the 15-minute block to a discussion. so hopefully there will be a chance to press the candidates for followup, or real answers if they try to dodge. because you know and our viewers know having watched 25 presidential debates during the primaries, they all do it. they dodge. they hear this is a question on jobs. what's my policy on jobs, this what is i'm going to say without necessarily answering the question asked. hopefully the mat, the discussion after the initial response will give us a chance to hear real answers. having studies up on these debates it seems like the need many gets moved not so much by these soaring rhetorical moment but by a gafer that one of them may have or by one moment of connection that they may have with the viewers at home. ronald reagan, there you go again. bill: i think you make a great point on that. what you are saying is it's built in a format that will help encourage robust exchanges that would alloy the other to challenge the other one. megyn: we
, at the university of denver, jim lehrer of pbs will be the moderator for what could be potentially the most indepth and lively debates in memory. we'll zero in on domestic policy with a new format that allows for more interaction between the two candidates and more time to discuss a single topic. let's go back to the debate hall. chief political correspondent candy crowley watching what's going on. you'll be the moderator in the next presidential debate. so you will watch this about as closely as anyone. >> absolutely, wolf. you know, this is, in fact, an arena that they use here at the university -- let me explain this picture this is president obama headed toward this debate site, we know that mitt romney is already here, and i -- obviously this is quite the happening, so you see a lot of folks out on the street. in fact, when we came in, people were hanging signs from the dorm rooms. this is an arena. i'm told it's used for ice hockey and sometimes basketball. tonight, it's pure politics. not a lot of big names or familiar faces, but i think nonpolitical junkies would recognize here tonight. but
claim the moderator, jim lehrer are of pbs was basically too right-wing and acting in concert with the romney campaign somehow, which is denial to a level that is truly amusing. bill: if that is the one observation you have i'mcuriousu observe this. this is al gore talking about the altitude in colorado, specifically the city of denver. roll this. >> obama arrived in denver at 2:00 p.m. today, just a few hours before the debate started. romney did his debate prep in denver. when you go to 5,000 feet -- >> exactly. >> and you only have a few hours to adjust. >> that is interesting. >> i don't know, maybe --. bill: did you hear that voice in the background, that's interesting? now, it is true, and it is factual he left vegas around 2:00 in the afternoon. but just on the face, what do you think of that? >> well that may be its effect on vice president gore. i think the president is in peek physical condition. i think he could probably handle 5,000 feet. this is why the president had a problem in the macro explanation, is, people like al gore, suck up to the president. every presi
and company. host of the pbs news hour, and they more contributing editor. maggie haberman, and nora o'donnell. we will give a shout out to helene cooper who is in the piece and had to be on the bus today. and our last best can't be here today. and we are sad about that. i want to start with a few questions, but i really want asked after sitting here next everybody finding out that it is a very incestuous group and they all have secrets about each other. i'm going to be kind and stick to our point which was talking about the election. given the explosion of social media today, as we know, we had to take our second round of photos not just for prints, but the photographer moved out and everybody went out there. how is it easier or harder to do your job today covering candidates? what kind of pressure does that put on your business? john bed and i will ask laura to start. >> when you talked about sharing secrets, chris looked over. like, i know a lot about you, nora. we go way back. i was probably one of the first people on twitter, and i think it has helped to gather information, it has
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)